Address
6 Batak St.
Varna, 9000
BULGARIA

Work Hours
Monday to Friday: 7AM - 7PM
Weekend: 10AM - 5PM

Antoninus Pius Rare AR Denarius Roman Empire 148-149 AD Silver Coin Aequitas on Reverse Museum Reproduction CSRD0001

38,00 

This Silver Roman Empire Denarius depicts Antoninus Pius. It has been minted in Rome in 148-149 A.D. The same type aureus is referenced in RIC 177b; C. 237; Calico 1499.

AVAILABLE ONLY FOR PRE-ORDER. This item may take 1-2 weeks to ship. Variations in shape, weight, and color are to be expected as each item is handmade.

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist
SKU: CSRD0001 Categories: , , Tags: , , , , ,

In Roman mythology, Aequitas, also known as Aecetia, was the goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Like Abundantia, she is depicted with a cornucopia, representing wealth from commerce. She is also shown holding a balance, representing equity and fairness. During the Roman Empire, Aequitas was sometimes worshipped as a quality or aspect of the emperor, under the name Aequitas Augusti.

Antoninus Pius, in full Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, original name Titus Aurelius Fulvius Boionius Arrius Antoninus, (born Sept. 19, 86, Lanuvium, Latium—died March 7, 161, Lorium, Etruria), Roman emperor from ad 138 to 161. Mild-mannered and capable, he was the fourth of the “five good emperors” who guided the empire through an 84-year period (96–180) of internal peace and prosperity. His family originated in Gaul, and his father and grandfathers had all been consuls.
After serving as consul in 120, Antoninus was assigned by the emperor Hadrian (ruled 117–138) to assist with judicial administration in Italy. He governed the province of Asia (c. 134) and then became an adviser to the Emperor. In 138 Antoninus was adopted by Hadrian and designated as his successor. Hadrian specified that two men—the future emperors Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus—were to succeed Antoninus. Upon acceding to power, Antoninus persuaded a reluctant Senate to offer the customary divine honours to Hadrian. For this, and possibly other such dutiful acts, he was given the surname Pius by the Senate. When his wife, Faustina, died in late 140 or early 141 he founded in her memory the Puellae Faustinianae, a charitable institution for the daughters of the poor.
References to Antoninus in 2nd-century literature are exceptionally scanty; it is certain that few striking events occurred during his 23-year reign. A rebellion in Roman Britain was suppressed, and in 142 a 36-mile (58-kilometre) garrisoned barrier—called the Antonine Wall—was built to extend the Roman frontier some 100 miles north of Hadrian’s Wall. Antoninus’ armies contained revolts in Mauretania, Germany, Dacia, and Egypt.
The feeling of well-being that pervaded the empire under Antoninus is reflected in the celebrated panegyric by the orator Aelius Aristides in 143–144. After Antoninus’ death, however, the empire suffered invasion by hostile tribes, followed by severe civil strife.
DESIGN:
Obverse side
Bare head right
Legend:
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XII

Reverse side
Aequitas standing left holding scales in right, cornucopia in left
Legend:
COS IIII

A perfect choice for Numismatists, Historians, Military Veterans, Collectors.

Weight 3,17 g
Dimensions 18,9 mm

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Antoninus Pius Rare AR Denarius Roman Empire 148-149 AD Silver Coin Aequitas on Reverse Museum Reproduction CSRD0001”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *